L’Artisan Verte Violette. For your reconsideration.

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There’s been a lot of talk about violet perfumes lately. Especially new and unusual ones like Comme des  Garsons + Stephen Jones, Frédéric Malle Dans Tes Bras, and The Unicorn Spell by Les Nez. But there is another violet to (re)consider, L’Artisan’s Verte Violette. Verte Violette has been around since 2000, but is an innovative and unique violet fragrance in its own right.

 

Initially, it is slightly reminiscent of the guerlinade base of Guerlain’s classics L’Heure Bleue and Mitsouko. Possibly from the way the green violet leaves create a crushed balsamy effect alongside the floral, powdery violet petals. But probably more so from the heliotrope, even though it is not listed on L’Artisan’s website scent description. Heliotrope’s almondy-vanilla aroma (some liken it to play-doh) is definitely mingling in the topnotes. Immediately this fragrance is both comforting and refreshing, like a sweet walk through a forest at dawn. Dabbing Verte Violette on your wrists and on the nape of your neck is akin to picking a nosegay of spring’s first violets and pressing their leaves between your fingers to release their dewy greenness.verte-violette

 

Once the heart of Verte Violette emerges, the heliotrope/vanillic scent becomes even more apparent. The sweetness is balanced nicely by a touch of iris soapiness and just a suggestion of damp cedar. As the fragrance progresses to its base, the cedar becomes more pronounced. But pronounced feels like too strong a word as the cedar note is quite subtle in the drydown. Alongside the cedar, iris supports the earthy vanillic violet; creating a warm and sweet, singular fragrance. I would consider its sillage mild to moderate and it has wonderful lasting power on my skin. For example, if I spray it in the early evening, it will last until bedtime and linger in the morning. Verte Violette gets a strong recommendation from me for someone who is seeking a soft violet that leans deep and green and away from a more candied violet such as Borsari’s Violetta di Parma

 

L’Artisan is not a strict natural perfume line, but they do not use phthalates or petrochemicals. (At least that was the response back from customer service). And they do not test on animals. In their literature they state that they use the “purist raw ingredients” but they do not state they use them exclusively. They have introduced an organic line, Jatamansi, which includes perfume and body care.

 

Verte Violette is available at L’Artisan.com and decants are available at The Perfumed Court.

 

Posted by ~Trish

 

photograph by Peter_Grahlmann on flickr

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